Survivalists and Preppers

Survivalists and PreppersSurvivalists and Preppers

When it comes to readiness for anything that life throws at you, there are survivalists and there are preppers. Although there sometimes seems to be a rivalry between survivalists and preppers, these terms are often used interchangeably, but they are actually very different. Survivalists and preppers have a common goal for sure, but there are major differences in the overall sentiment and outcome of their behavior.

A Common Bond

There are many commonalities between survivalists and preppers. At their core, both have the similar ideal of being ready for a disaster. Both survivalists and preppers alike spend time and resources to prepare for impending disasters such as major weather events, war, and even statistically unlikely disasters.

Both of these types of people have a strong will to live and make preparations for themselves and their families not only to survive a potentially disastrous event, but also after the event. Many of the preparations will involve supplies to allow them to continue to live without aid for an extended period of time.

Different Strokes

The difference between survivalists and preppers comes down to how seriously they take themselves. Make no mistakes about it, both of these groups of people are quite serious about their preparations for the future safety and comfort of themselves and their families. The core difference is really how seriously they take it, and how extreme their plans and preparations are.

There are also differences in how both of these groups prepare for unforeseen events and disasters. For example, one group might stockpile huge amounts of non-perishable foods while the other will have a smaller stockpile and rely heavily on seeds to grow their own food.

Survivalist Manifesto

Survivalists differ from preppers in the way they make their preparations and their overall idea of surviving after an event.

Survivalists, for example, tend to look to the Earth and wilderness for much of their survival needs. A survivalist will learn about the area around them and look to live off the land rather than having huge stockpiles. These people will likely hunt, forage, and grow their own food for their survival needs.

A survivalist is really exactly what their name suggests. They will do what needs to be done to survive. They do not expect to rely on the comforts of civilized life to sustain them during or in the aftermath of a disastrous event.

Prepper’s Platform

Preppers differ from survivalists in how they plan to survive and even thrive after a disaster.

Preppers will usually have large stockpiles of supplies, non-perishable foods, and other items that will help them remain safe, alive, and even comfortable during and after such an event. A prepper will typically have a stockpile large enough not only to get them through the event, but large enough to sustain them until rescue.

Preppers are usually considered to be the more “serious” or “fervent” in their preparations. This might be because their preparations are often more visible to the people around them. The lengths to which preppers will prepare and stockpile are extremely varied from person to person.

Survivalists and preppers are different in the way that they make their preparations and their overall ideals for how to survive, but at their core they are very similar. Both groups do the work and planning necessary to ensure that they not only survive a potential disaster, but thrive in the aftermath. They are both built on the platform of hard work, planning, and optimism that they will survive no matter what happens.

Doug

hi, thanks for pointing out the differences. My thoughts are that a plan that includes both a short term plan, (preparedness) with a long term plan, (survivalist) would be better. One can only store up so much food for so long and seeds will not be very useful in the freezing ice storms.
When disasters happen less frequently, it is easy to get complacent and forget the prepared state.
Thanks for the reminders.

itsamystery

I see your points, Doug. Enough dry goods and emergency staples for a month, a way to start fire, have clean drinking water and a varied first aid kit as well as supplies for pets and medications for ourselves and our pets should be enough to get through most emergencies. And yes, complacency can be a killer.

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